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Steve Jobs – Thoughts on Music

Steve Jobs openly takes a position against DRM

“Why would the big four music companies agree to let Apple and others distribute their music without using DRM systems to protect it? The simplest answer is because DRMs haven’t worked, and may never work, to halt music piracy. Though the big four music companies require that all their music sold online be protected with DRMs, these same music companies continue to sell billions of CDs a year which contain completely unprotected music. That’s right! No DRM system was ever developed for the CD, so all the music distributed on CDs can be easily uploaded to the Internet, then (illegally) downloaded and played on any computer or player.

In 2006, under 2 billion DRM-protected songs were sold worldwide by online stores, while over 20 billion songs were sold completely DRM-free and unprotected on CDs by the music companies themselves. The music companies sell the vast majority of their music DRM-free, and show no signs of changing this behavior, since the overwhelming majority of their revenues depend on selling CDs which must play in CD players that support no DRM system.

So if the music companies are selling over 90 percent of their music DRM-free, what benefits do they get from selling the remaining small percentage of their music encumbered with a DRM system? There appear to be none. If anything, the technical expertise and overhead required to create, operate and update a DRM system has limited the number of participants selling DRM protected music. If such requirements were removed, the music industry might experience an influx of new companies willing to invest in innovative new stores and players. This can only be seen as a positive by the music companies.

Much of the concern over DRM systems has arisen in European countries. Perhaps those unhappy with the current situation should redirect their energies towards persuading the music companies to sell their music DRM-free. For Europeans, two and a half of the big four music companies are located right in their backyard. The largest, Universal, is 100% owned by Vivendi, a French company. EMI is a British company, and Sony BMG is 50% owned by Bertelsmann, a German company. Convincing them to license their music to Apple and others DRM-free will create a truly interoperable music marketplace. Apple will embrace this wholeheartedly.”

Sounds a bit flower-power’ish, but still – bold move.

But Steve, why not lead by example? There are artists that are not part of any of the above mentioned studios that would probably *love* to sell their music DRM free on the iTMS.

Will you offer them a path?

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  1. Buzz’ La lettre qui a déjà fait le tour d’internet
    http://chauvesouris.wordpress.com/2007/02/07/buzz-la-lettre-qui-a-deja-fait-le-tour-dinternet/

    Steve Jobs, le très célèbre meneur d’Apple, défraye la chrnoique Web. Et ce n’est pas pour le lancement d’un nouveau produit multimédia d’Apple. Une lettre ouverte de Steve Jobs fait le point sur les DRM et prend posistion en faveur de leur abandon généralisé.

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