Watch these watches!

I just saw two interesting watches this morning that I wanted to share:

pimpin aint easy IP Black by Pimp

“This limited production 72 White or Yellow L.E.D. watch lights up brighter than any other watch available. The time is read by reading the hours on the left and the minutes on the right. When the button is pressed for the time it will spiral all the lights on and off then show the time. Press the button again and the day and date will be displayed. Now what really makes this watch stand out, is the light up feature, the watch lights up every light in a spiral and then off in a spiral every 2 minutes from 6 PM to 1 AM. Super flashy and you will be Pimpin large. Pimpin was never easy till now. Grab one and see for yourself.”

Active Reactor by Radio Active

“Stranger than your mother-in-law, the all new Radio Active watch just hit the stores in Japan, featuring an all new unique way to display the time. Looks hard at first but trust me after about one day, you can tell the time almost as fast as a regular watch. Guaranteed that everyone who sees it will ask you about it.

The time is displayed by simply adding the lights. 20 plus 10 plus 2= 32 minutes. The Red Warning light is for the 6 hour mark and the Danger gauge for the other 6 hours. See below for details.”

More information on http://www.tokyoflash.com.

That reminds me to look on eBay for my favourite watch, the Chromachron:

I may soon get one of these again. More infos on that wonderful concept here.

5 thoughts on “Watch these watches!

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  4. I’ve found the Chromachron concept very interesting ever since I ran across it in grad school in the 90s. A little-known X11 program (which was where I first encountered it) displayed a Chromachron clock on the desktop of X terminals, and it’s apparently been ported to Mac and Java.

    I’ve got a Linux version of the Chromachron clock called gchrom (gchrom.sourceforge.net) that I just updated; you might like it. But mostly I was just searching around for references to Chromachron and was happy to see that somebody else likes the idea of telling time with colors.

  5. I've found the Chromachron concept very interesting ever since I ran across it in grad school in the 90s. A little-known X11 program (which was where I first encountered it) displayed a Chromachron clock on the desktop of X terminals, and it's apparently been ported to Mac and Java.

    I've got a Linux version of the Chromachron clock called gchrom (gchrom.sourceforge.net) that I just updated; you might like it. But mostly I was just searching around for references to Chromachron and was happy to see that somebody else likes the idea of telling time with colors.

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