What does it take for bloggers to be accepted as journalists?

Tarek told me he was going to visit CeBIT later this month, but they wouldn’t register him as a journalist, because he lacks the “proper” papers.

Following the Apple suit, it seems american judges see this the same way.

What can be done? Would it be possible to register some kind of corporate shell that could issue press passes to bloggers? What’s the legal status about a press pass anyway – do I have to be accredited or something?

The german society for journalists lists several possible criteria and say that “the sum of objective evidence must show the sole or substantial journalistic activity”. They also suppose you work under some kind of corporate umbrella, which they require you to prove.

Well, that leaves room for interpretaion, doesn’t it? Is anyone going to try to be accredited as a blogger?

How does it work in other countries – as I blog in english, would it be possible to get an english, US or irish press pass?

Comments appreciated.

19 thoughts on “What does it take for bloggers to be accepted as journalists?

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  3. They also suppose you work under some kind of corporate umbrella, which they require you to prove.

    Actually, that’s not quite true. If you freelance then they ask you to provide proof of having worked as a journalist before – which they expand on by listing: copies of articles, letters from publishers etc. However they do not list weblogs.

  4. They also suppose you work under some kind of corporate umbrella, which they require you to prove.

    Actually, that's not quite true. If you freelance then they ask you to provide proof of having worked as a journalist before – which they expand on by listing: copies of articles, letters from publishers etc. However they do not list weblogs.

  5. But they do also allow you to list the websites (which I guess includes blogs) where your work is published.

    I applied and got credited OK, though I do write for a few other sites sometimes, like Mobile Burn, Lockergnome and The Feature too.

    Russell

  6. But they do also allow you to list the websites (which I guess includes blogs) where your work is published.

    I applied and got credited OK, though I do write for a few other sites sometimes, like Mobile Burn, Lockergnome and The Feature too.

    Russell

  7. We applied last week for our blog mobileblog.it and were credited.
    We also were credited for last Geneve Autoshow with our sister site autoblog.it.
    Just send them a paper in which you declare that you are writing for that blog and I think they will approve your request (maybe it’s too late).

  8. We applied last week for our blog mobileblog.it and were credited.
    We also were credited for last Geneve Autoshow with our sister site autoblog.it.
    Just send them a paper in which you declare that you are writing for that blog and I think they will approve your request (maybe it's too late).

  9. I’ve already applied as a visitor and i’m sure i can sort out the press-pass if i end up going.

    What threw me in the sign up process is that they asked me to upload a document that proved i was a journolist. I automatically assumed that they meant a press-badge or a letter from an editor or a certificate or “something”. I’ll try uploading a document saying who I am and the websites i write for (including http://www.it-observer.com which should be good enough if my blog isn’t) and see if that works.

    Thanks for the post Frank and to those who commented for the info.

  10. I've already applied as a visitor and i'm sure i can sort out the press-pass if i end up going.

    What threw me in the sign up process is that they asked me to upload a document that proved i was a journolist. I automatically assumed that they meant a press-badge or a letter from an editor or a certificate or "something". I'll try uploading a document saying who I am and the websites i write for (including http://www.it-observer.com which should be good enough if my blog isn't) and see if that works.

    Thanks for the post Frank and to those who commented for the info.

  11. I find this very interesting, given the fact that just last week I considered myself to be a journalist. What proof is there to say that I’m not? And according to who’s standards is proof considered? There should be a society or organization of some sort to allow bloggers to be accepted as journalists based on the stuff that they blog about. Then again… thats just my opinion.

  12. I find this very interesting, given the fact that just last week I considered myself to be a journalist. What proof is there to say that I'm not? And according to who's standards is proof considered? There should be a society or organization of some sort to allow bloggers to be accepted as journalists based on the stuff that they blog about. Then again… thats just my opinion.

  13. You might be surprised to learn that in the Apple case, the issue of who is a journalist and who isn’t is not nearly as central as you’ve been led to believe. The journalists making a big deal of it are most likely just showing their (understandable) bias against all limitations on the press.

    If you really want to understand what is going on, read the eff site that gives the details of the lawyer’s briefs. They are interesting to read.

    One tidbit, Apple’s lawyer is really arguing that Jason O’Grady is not a journalist when it comes to a particular article–not that he is never a journalist. To quote, “With respect to the specific acts at issue here…O’Grady performed no journalistic function.” Now I personally think this is a weak argument, bad journalism is still journalism but it shows that the press isn’t getting the whole story out.

    Another tidbit, the case has more or less devolved to whether or not PowerPage.org’s email service provider has the right to release powerpages email to Apple under court order. This still goes to the question of journalism because the EFF lawyer is arguing that under the Stored Communication Act, NFox (the email service provider) does not have the right to release any info with Jason O’Grady’s permission.

    Anyway, there is a lot more. You should read up on it and get a jump the mainstream journalists who are mostly getting it wrong.

  14. You might be surprised to learn that in the Apple case, the issue of who is a journalist and who isn't is not nearly as central as you've been led to believe. The journalists making a big deal of it are most likely just showing their (understandable) bias against all limitations on the press.

    If you really want to understand what is going on, read the eff site that gives the details of the lawyer's briefs. They are interesting to read.

    One tidbit, Apple's lawyer is really arguing that Jason O'Grady is not a journalist when it comes to a particular article–not that he is never a journalist. To quote, "With respect to the specific acts at issue here…O'Grady performed no journalistic function." Now I personally think this is a weak argument, bad journalism is still journalism but it shows that the press isn't getting the whole story out.

    Another tidbit, the case has more or less devolved to whether or not PowerPage.org's email service provider has the right to release powerpages email to Apple under court order. This still goes to the question of journalism because the EFF lawyer is arguing that under the Stored Communication Act, NFox (the email service provider) does not have the right to release any info with Jason O'Grady's permission.

    Anyway, there is a lot more. You should read up on it and get a jump the mainstream journalists who are mostly getting it wrong.

  15. This is great, because at the end of it all, bloggers should get the same rights as a journalist, assuming the courts are sane.

    Which they are not.

  16. This is great, because at the end of it all, bloggers should get the same rights as a journalist, assuming the courts are sane.

    Which they are not.

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