in Mobile

College students turn away from landlines

Slashdot: College students turn away from landlines

“You’re as likely to find a landline in a college dorm as you’re an old typewriter, according to this Washington Post article on MSNBC. While roughly 30% of college students had a cell phone 5 years ago, more than 90% have them today, resulting in student directories including out-of-state numbers instead of 4-digit extensions. More trivia on college students: 90% own a PC, 65% have broadband, 62% own a stereo system, 74% have a DVD player, 55% have a gaming system.”

Seems like a natural move to me. Cell phone calls have gotten cheaper by the month, and the advantage over landlines is obvious. Also, broadband is usually provided by the campus.

You could probably see similar numbers in germany, if legislation wouldn’t make it so difficult to get broadband without landlines, due to the old telecoms monopoly still working in spite of the privatization efforts.

If I could, I’d get rid of my landline immediately – nearly 40 Euros fixed costs without any inluded minutes – what a waste.

Leave a Reply

  1. Saying that you pay “40 Euros fixed costs” for the landline in Germay is misleading since this includes internet access by DSL (the mere landline starts at 15.66). Indeed there certainly should be some savings if we didn’t have to get the landline phone connection to use DSL, but don’t expect too much. For around 35 Euros a month (including taxes), you can get either DSL internet access w/ a landline phone, or cable internet w/ cable TV where available. Compare this to the rates for, say, Comcast cable in the US where you can expect to pay something like $56.99 (plus tax) for cable internet (w/o cable TV).

  2. Saying that you pay "40 Euros fixed costs" for the landline in Germay is misleading since this includes internet access by DSL (the mere landline starts at 15.66). Indeed there certainly should be some savings if we didn't have to get the landline phone connection to use DSL, but don't expect too much. For around 35 Euros a month (including taxes), you can get either DSL internet access w/ a landline phone, or cable internet w/ cable TV where available. Compare this to the rates for, say, Comcast cable in the US where you can expect to pay something like $56.99 (plus tax) for cable internet (w/o cable TV).

  3. Well, it’s roughly what I pay, and the other options you’re mentioning are just not available where I live. The underlying problem remains. And as long as this is the case, better alternatives will have a hard time developing and/or getting cheaper.

  4. Well, it's roughly what I pay, and the other options you're mentioning are just not available where I live. The underlying problem remains. And as long as this is the case, better alternatives will have a hard time developing and/or getting cheaper.

  5. Sorry, I wasn’t quite clear … What I meant is that you are not paying 40 Euros too much (which is what it sounded like in your original text) but maybe about 5 Euros. That’s still a lot, but in the end you are probably paying less than you would have to in the US.

    It seems the most feasible way to save many is to love thy neighbor and share a WLAN with them ;-)

  6. Sorry, I wasn't quite clear … What I meant is that you are not paying 40 Euros too much (which is what it sounded like in your original text) but maybe about 5 Euros. That's still a lot, but in the end you are probably paying less than you would have to in the US.

    It seems the most feasible way to save many is to love thy neighbor and share a WLAN with them ;-)